New technology being tested that aims to prevent 65 percent of pedestrian collisions

Image result for New technology being tested that aims to prevent 65 percent of pedestrian collisionsWashington — Car makers hope new technology can help save lives. According to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, deadly pedestrian accidents are up 45 percent nationwide since 2009. The Department of Transportation finds the nearly 6,000 killed in 2017 made up 19 percent of all traffic fatalities.

Now IIHS is testing technology it believes could prevent up to 65 percent of pedestrians collisions, cutting deaths by 58 percent.

The technology uses cameras and sensors to warn drivers and, if needed, automatically applies the brakes. The institute tested the system on 11 small SUVs. Nine earned either superior or advanced ratings for avoiding or reducing the severity of collisions at speeds ranging from 12 to 37 miles an hour.

The Subraru Forester and Toyota RAV4 did the best. But the BMW system did so poorly it received no credit at all.

“It either didn’t break or didn’t mitigate the speed enough,” said David Aylor, with IIHS.

IIHS wants the technology to be standard on all vehicles in the near future.

 

[“source=cbsnews”]

Paytm Money appoints Suresh Vasudevan as Chief Technology Officer

Paytm Money appoints Suresh Vasudevan as Chief Technology Officer

Paytm Money, the wholly owned subsidiary of One97 Communications Limited, has announced the appointment of Suresh Vasudevan as its Chief Technology Officer (CTO). Paytm Money is the online platform for mutual fund investments.

Talking about his selection, Suresh Vasudevan, CTO, Paytm Money said “I have been an early adopter of Paytm Money as a user; and admired the focus & passion with which the engineering team has built the product, and scaled it to its leadership position within just a few months of its launch. I am humbled to lead this team on the journey to build a world-class investment product for millions of Indians.”

Vasudevan will be based out of Bangalore and would lead the engineering and technology functions of Paytm Money. Before joining Paytm Money, Vasudevan had held a role of VP – Engineering with Paytm Mall.

Announcing the appointment on Twitter, Paytm Money said, “We’re thrilled to have Suresh on board as our Chief Technology Officer and scale to new heights together.”

We’re thrilled to have Suresh on board as our Chief Technology Officer and scale to new heights together.

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1:37 PM – Feb 20, 2019
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Prior to Paytm Money, Suresh Vasudevan worked with several startups and enterprise product companies across payments, e-commerce and fintech domains. He possesses over 20 years of experience in product development.

Suresh Vasudevan had also worked at Amazon India as the Head of Engineering for Alexa Skills Certification platform and Unicel Technologies as VP Engineering. He had also served in a leadership role at Sify and mChek.

Announcing the appointment of Suresh Vasudevan, Pravin Jadhav, Whole-time Director, Paytm Money said “We are very excited to welcome Suresh onboard as our Chief Technology Officer to lead our engineering teams. His rich experience across multiple technology & industry verticals would be of immense value to help build and scale our investment platform. Suresh will also be working on building Data Science and AI capabilities for Paytm Money as we continue focusing on automating our platform and building robo-advisory based investment products to ease the investment advice and decision-making process for our users”.

[“source=businesstoday”]

This Article Is Fake News. But It’s Also The Work of AI

Image result for This Article Is Fake News. But It’s Also The Work of AIThe use of fake news stories for political disinformation has become a major concern for governments around the world in the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The Federal Bureau of Investigation concluded Russia used false news reports, spread through social media, to try to sway voters. Writing these stories still needed someone to sit behind a keyboard.

Now OpenAI, a non-profit artificial intelligence research group in San Francisco, has unveiled a machine learning algorithm that can generate coherent text, including fake news articles, after being given just a small sample to build on. The algorithm can be tuned to imitate the writing style of the sample text.

Here’s an example of the system at work that OpenAI provided. The system was only given the first two sentences, which were written by a human:

A train carriage containing controlled nuclear materials was stolen in Cincinnati today. Its whereabouts are unknown.

And this is the rest of the news article that the AI wrote, with no human guidance:

The incident occurred on the downtown train line, which runs from Covington and Ashland stations.

In an email to Ohio news outlets, the U.S. Department of Energy said it is working with the Federal Railroad Administration to find the thief.

“The theft of this nuclear material will have significant negative consequences on public and environmental health, our workforce and the economy of our nation,” said Tom Hicks, the U.S. Energy Secretary, in a statement. “Our top priority is to secure the theft and ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

The stolen material was taken from the University of Cincinnati’s Research Triangle Park nuclear research site, according to a news release from Department officials.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission did not immediately release any information.

According to the release, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Security is leading that team’s investigation.

“The safety of people, the environment and the nation’s nuclear stockpile is our highest priority,” Hicks said. “We will get to the bottom of this and make no excuses.

Because of its potential to be misused for creating disinformation, OpenAI said it had chosen not to make the most powerful versions of its algorithm available for public use nor was it publishing the source code and training data used to create the software.

 

[“source=fortune”]

The grip of technology

My Internet has been down since the morning of February 7 and, at the time of writing this on February 14, the problem was ongoing. So much for the “we will send a technician in three to five working days” promise made by my service provider. Imagine in this day and age that policy still exists, though. Life certainly is not on in that regard.

To be honest, this experience has taught me that in as much as I frequently threaten to drop everything and get off the technology grid for a few days, I really can’t do it. I feel completely lost. As lost as Hansel and Gretel wandering through a forest of technological frustration. All the devices and gadgets are there, but it’s like they serve no purpose. And to make matters worse, a few months ago I had cancelled my mobile data plan and opted for a call-as-you-go plan because I saw no need to keep paying for a data plan when there is wifi just about everywhere.

So basically, it meant that because I could not possibly work from home. I had to get up, get dressed, spend at least two hours in traffic to the office and back. And while I was at home, I had no way of getting quick information, no Netflix, no social media, no YouTube. I had no idea what mischief Fallon was up to in the latest Dynasty episode, had no idea what was trending on FB, unable to communicate via WhatsApp, nothing. When it came to helping my son with homework, I was unable to Google fast answers and had to resort to old school methods of guiding him along. It was either I read and re-read the method to change a decimal into a fraction until I grasped the concept (never did at school), or phone a friend (easier option). And while I did get time to do quite a bit of reading, my tech withdrawal symptoms were bad, to the point where I felt like the walls were closing in.

This whole experience got me to thinking, if my old Gen X tail, which is tottering on the borders of barely understanding the technology and embracing it, was having such a hard time coping with the absence of said technology, what can I expect of my ten-year-old who knows nothing else? Who, it seems, knew everything there was to know about an iPad from the day he was born. Who was so confused the first time he picked up a landline and heard a dial tone. “Aunty, come and hear the strange noise the phone is making,” he had said as he led her in earnest to where the fixed line was plugged in. Who assists me when I’m having problems with my computer and phone, very impatiently, mind you, because I’m “too slow”. The same kid who, a few weeks ago sat with his manual and set up his new PS4 with zero assistance from me because I didn’t know how to begin to help him. How can I now expect him to do things in the same way I did them?

I recall about a year ago he was doing his Vocabulary homework, and instead of using his hard copy dictionary he googled the words and wrote down the meanings. I, of course, insisted that he do it the traditional way – the way I knew how. “You won’t have a computer and Internet service in the exam room to Google the words,” I told him. “Neither will I have a dictionary,” he countered. “You are always saying I take too long to complete my homework. This way is easier and faster,” he pressed. He beefed up his argument with the fact that he knows how to use the dictionary in case there is a tech failure. He was right and I relented. Because lets face it, there is no going back to doing some things the old school way. Things like hard copy encyclopedias and dictionaries can now be deemed pre-historic.

So, I thought, if I have suffered so much from this experience, I can only imagine what he must be going through. How can I reprimand him for being in a foul mood because he can’t hook up with his friends on the PS to play Fortnite? Or because he can’t get some well-deserved time off after lessons to binge on one of his favourite Netflix series? Or that he can’t chat with his friend Isabella in Ohio on WhatsApp? I understand that reading, outdoor play etc are important and that there should be a limit on the amount of time children spend on screens. But just as my generation and the generations before and after had that special something that was “our life”, technology is this generation’s and we can’t fight it. No wonder he reacted as if there was a death in the family each time I threatened to sell or give away his precious devices as a form of punishment. After this experience, I will have to be a bit more lenient with my threats. Note to self, stay away from “sell” or “give away”.

As for my former Internet service provider, I thank you for the lesson, but I’ve learnt it well enough. I don’t want or need a repeat.

 

[“source=newsday”]

Recapping the saga of a misogynistic beer article that enraged the brewing world this week

There are stages to controversies in the social media age. First, the scandal breaks. Then it spreads. Criticism rains down on the perceived offender from across the internet. A few beats later, that person emerges publicly to defend themselves. The public generally rejects such an apology or criticizes the apology itself. Eventually, heads roll and/or the public moves on. End scene.

The craft beer world has moved through precisely those steps this week. A few days ago, an article published on the front page of regional beer publication Great Lakes Brewing News began making the social-media rounds. The article, which ran under the byline of Great Lakes Brewing News publisher Bill Metzger, ostensibly was about Scotch ale and cask ale, but its sexist tone drew swift and forceful criticism. Choice lines from the 2,800-word hybrid article/essay, which was written in the first-person, include: “In the age of #metoo, the pendulum has swung too far. One aggressive move and a man’s career can derail. I feel the walls closing around me, my room to move shrinking. My instincts to bed every woman I see are reducing from a king-sized mattress to a cot, the size of which I only remember from a tour in Iraq.”

You can read more excerpts via The Buffalo News, including the article’s repeated mentions of using alcohol to lower women’s sexual inhibitions.

When I first saw screenshots of the article, I blinked slowly. How was any of this about beer? How did this get published on the front page of… anything? What does Bill Metzger have to say for himself? Other beer writers and breweries themselves were equally upset, with some who’d advertised in the publication condemning the piece and withdrawing future ads. (Metzger’s Brewing News company publishes other regional beer newspapers as well.) Some breweries burned the publication in effigy.

So, we’ve arrived at the scandal stage where the accused emerges to defend themselves. Per a screenshot posted by the creative director for Chicago’s Pipeworks brewery, who criticized the article on Twitter, Bill Metzger responded to her with the below message which includes the by-now-a-punchline phrase: “I’m sorry you were offended.”

A statement on Great Lakes Brewing News’ Facebook page states the article was intended as parody and does not reflect the views of the author. Metzger’s statement continues: “Nowhere in this piece is there an endorsement of misogyny nor hatred. It is a simple parody of a disgusting attitude that I have seen often. We have been publishing the occasional piece that does anger people as some topics seem too toxic to discuss rationally. And it most certainly does not reflect my views; those who actually know me beyond a few articles written and/or published know that much.”

Forbes beer writer Tara Nurin, who has long covered women’s role in beer, spoke to Metzger by phone and found him “genuinely and deeply pained that his admittedly misbegotten attempt to highlight the problem of sexual harassment and assault in brewing has backfired so badly.” Still, she and other beer writers ultimately reject his parody defense, with writer Robin LeBlanc calling the whole mess “a special kind of trainwreck.” This beer writer agrees.

There’s never a good time for failed satire about sexual assault, but Metzger’s timing is especially bad. Earlier this month, the CEO of Actual Brewing in Columbus, Ohio, stepped down amid an investigation into allegations he repeatedly sexually assaulted multiple women. Last year, Jackson Hole, Wyoming-based Melvin Brewing faced backlash from retailers and customers after one of its brewers inappropriately touched an employee of another brewery, bringing to light what some called a larger “bro culture” within Melvin.

Though women in any male-dominated industry face challenges, those challenges can be especially dangerous when your daily job functions involve alcohol. I’ve seen the beer industry take important steps to make itself safer and more welcoming to women and minorities, but as recent stories of assault and discrimination illustrate, there is still much work to be done. That women’s painful efforts to share their #metoo experiences would be the object of abysmal satire only prove how long the road will be.

 

[“source=thetakeout”]

 

Virginia delegate backs off plan to introduce articles of impeachment against Fairfax

Image result for Virginia delegate backs off plan to introduce articles of impeachment against Fairfax(CNN)Virginia delegate Patrick Hope on Monday backed off his plans to introduce articles of impeachment against embattled Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax.

“Yesterday I sent draft language to my colleagues on the first step of an impeachment action regarding the Lt. Governor. There has been an enormous amount of sincere and thoughtful feedback which has led to additional conversations that need to take place before anything is filed,” he wrote in a tweet early Monday.
Hope’s decision came during a conference call Sunday night with Democratic members of the Virginia House of Delegates in which members voiced their strong opinion to Hope that the caucus was not prepared for articles of impeachment to be introduced, according to a source familiar with the talks.
In another tweet, Hope said, “We owe it to all parties involved – especially the victims – to make sure that we have thought through every option the General Assembly has,” adding that he believes the two women who have accused Fairfax of sexual assault. According to the source, Hope was assured during the call that Democrats will support some form of an independent investigation into the matter.
“I promise that my work on this issue will be tireless until we have a process and outcome that treats these women with the respect they deserve going forward,” he wrote in a third tweet.
Hope’s plan to introduce articles of impeachment had been in the works since at least Friday. In an email sent to his House Democratic colleagues, he said that he planned to file a resolution first thing Monday morning that lists the reasons he believes that Fairfax’s conduct warrants removal from office.
The lieutenant governor was accused by two women of sexual assault, including rape by one of the women. Fairfax released a statement on Saturday acknowledging both interactions with the women, but said both instances were consensual.
Had Hope introduced the resolution, it would have been the first step in the removal process. The process begins in the House, and if it passes with a majority vote, it moves to the Senate, where a trial would be held to determine if Fairfax will be removed.
The resolution must have the support of the Speaker of the House, Republican Kirkland Cox, in order to even be brought for a vote for the house floor. He had not indicated if he would allow that to happen.
The resolution would have come at a time when the top three elected officials in Virginia are embroiled in scandal. A photo surfaced from Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam’s decades-old medical school yearbook showing one person wearing blackface and one person wearing a white KKK hood and robe. Northam said he has no plans to resign despite mounting pressure. Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring also admitted last week he wore blackface at a 1980 party.
A copy of the drafted resolution, obtained by CNN, reads, “the House of Delegates believes all allegations of sexual assault must be taken with the utmost seriousness,” and describes the allegations made by the two women as “credible in nature.”
The resolution reads: “now, therefore, be it RESOLVED by the House of Delegates, That proceedings for the impeachment of Lieutenant Governor Justin E. Fairfax shall be initiated.”
The resolution also would have directed the House Committee for Courts of Justice to hold hearings “to inquire into the allegations made against” Fairfax, and whether his alleged actions against the two women “constitute conduct sufficient to provide grounds for impeachment pursuant to Article IV, Section 17 of the Constitution of Virginia.”
Fairfax’s spokeswoman Lauren Burke issued a statement in response to reports that Hope was planning to introduce the resolution that reads, “The Lt. Governor is aggressively exploring options for a thorough, independent, and impartial investigation of these allegations. We hope, for example, that the FBI will show a willingness to investigate.”
“It is especially important in the most difficult of times that we pay attention to our fundamental Constitutional values,” the statement continues. “He believes that an inherently political process is not the most likely path for learning the truth.”
“The Lt. Governor is confident in the truth that will emerge from an independent impartial investigation,” the statement reads.
[“source=edition.cnn”]

Self-love in the age of technology

As Valentine’s Day rolls around, here’s how technology took centre-stage in our ‘self-love lives’ — for better or worse

At 10.30 pm on October 29, 1969, the first message on the Internet was sent by UCLA student Charley Kline in the form of two letters ‘lo’. Romantics, to this day, debate that it was obviously meant to be ‘love’, whereas irrefutable records show Charley meant to type ‘login’ and the system had crashed after the first two letters.

Fast forward 50 years to present-day and we can send all sorts of lovey-dovey messages in the form of quick texts, GIFs, SnapChats, videos, Instagram stories… the list is endless. Given there are countless expressions and forms of love in the digital space, thanks to technology mediating everything we do, this behemoth blanket of binaries became more than just an aid — it is now a crutch, a platform and our confidante.

We’ve seen love traverse from paper to screen to holograms to Artificial Intelligence — even to the point when, if we’re bored enough, we can ask Siri if they love us. It’s not just romantic love to which our technology panders; there is body positivity and self-love, so let’s take a look at these, and evaluate if the Internet is doing justice or doing harm.

Micro-blogging sites such as Instagram and Facebook have contributed big-time to both the depreciation and appreciation of self-love. We tend to judge our self-worth in terms of likes, responses, the number of private messages we get, and so on. Maybe, ease up on social media, whether it means taking a break for a few days or even going full-Monty and removing yourself entirely from the platform to become more purposeful in other ways.

That’s what psychologist Raisa Luther of Hope Trust recommends too. “Mental health is impacted by everything around us. As the saying goes for our body: you are what you eat, the same goes for our mind as well. What we feed our mind manifests in good or ill mental health.”

“Further, technology is a highly powerful tool in developing or destroying relationships. It reduces the importance and need for face-to-face interaction — this can result in changing the very face and nature of human relationships,” Raisa continues, “I fear that we are so influenced by technology and its various components that we may one day forget what it means to be human, or feel human. I have seen the same in my practice, where people get so influenced by technology that it affects their self-worth, self-esteem and even their identity. FOMO leads to a lot of my clients leading dual lives — and sometimes it is difficult to maintain boundaries between an online persona and the real, offline self.”

We heart pods
  • Though the rise of the podcast was driven by true crime narratives, stories on the world of startups and more, Love and relationships have not been very far behind. The popular Modern Love podcast by The New York Times is one of the most popular podcasts in this genre. Bengaluru-based Paravathi Shiva, an IT specialist, says, “When I was growing up, dealing with college breakups and infatuations, you only had agony aunt columns or extremely weird late-night radio shows, where the host spoke in a high-pitched voice and dispensed repetitive advice. That has changed now. I am married now and listen to podcasts on relationships and more. Most of these podcasts are conversational and extremely relatable, making you feel like you are part of the conversation and not just a member of the audience. In the Modern Love podcast, I was very moved by the reading of You May Want to Marry my Husband, an essay written by writer Amy Krouse Rosenthal. It was beautifully-written, of course, but listening to it was even better.” Sales manager Shuvan C from Delhi agrees with this assessment. “I do not listen to many podcasts. However, I do like to listen in to the art of love podcast, where a dating expert offers an entertaining take on love and relationships. The best part about podcasts is that it is more informative and has lovely stories. I am single and feel that it makes me more confident to negotiate the complex web of relationships.”
  • (As told to Nikhil Varma)

However, studies show the response is quite dependent on a person’s disposition; are they naturally vulnerable to social pressures imbibed by technology? “We found that having a sense of purpose allowed people to navigate virtual feedback with more rigidity and persistence. With a sense of purpose, they’re not so malleable to the number of likes they receive… Purposeful people noticed the positive feedback, but did not rely on it to feel good about themselves,” surmises Cornell University professor Anthony Burrow, co-author of study ‘‘Likes’ less likely to affect self-esteem of people with purpose’.

Video ga-ga

YouTube, despite its ongoing strife around policy and content creation, does have its happy corners, and with beauty vlogging an all-time rage, the subculture of body positivity channels has been crawling up the subscriber ladder, but not necessarily T-series-style. And no, we aren’t referring to over-hyped fitness gurus or flat-tummy-detox-tea sponsors who live for monetisation!

Pooja Kochar runs one of India’s growing channels, ‘30ish’, for body positivity chats. “30ish is trusting its internal GPS and turning towards YouTube. We are being mentored by #YouTubeSpaceMumbai to understand viewer preference for digital content,” she says on her site, “We conceptualise, create content and manage execution of social media campaigns which are completely customised. These campaigns are further supported through our blog, Twitter feed and Instagram page. We will live your brand, to give it the most authentic narrative.”

The cross-promotion of platforms for community-driven positivity is ideal in rebuilding the YouTube algorithms a lot of users have a problem with, especially with the site’s very flawed and clearly capitalistic ‘Trending’ section. With the Internet brimming with life-threatening challenge videos and dangerous pranks, it’ll be useful to employ to our advantage.

So this Valentine’s Day, when you see hearts and cheesy texts floating around, be sure to love yourself first and foremost.

 

[“source=thehindu”]

Money & relationships: What you should do if your husband doesn’t share financial details

spend-1
Try to seek the help of a mediator if your husband is reluctant to share crucial financial information
Among married couples with a single earning partner, a skew often slips into the financial equation. If the husband takes care of everything, from earning and spending, to saving and investing, there is a tendency to dictate terms to the non-earning spouse. In some cases, the wife has to ask, remind or grovel for money every month to take care of household or personal expenses. In many marriages, the husband shares money, but not information regarding his salary, spending or investments. It is crucial for both the spouses not only to be in the loop when it comes to finances, but also be equal beneficiaries of wealth. If you are not, and are having trouble finding common ground, go through the following points to know what you should do.

1. Know your financial rights
A wife has the legal right to secure basic amenities and comfort—food, clothes, residence, education and medical treatment— for herself and her children from the husband. So, understand that as a homemaker, you should not have to ask your husband for money; he is bound by law to provide it to you. Also, the wife has a right to know the details of her husband’s salary, as per a 2018 ruling by the Madhya Pradesh High Court. This is important because the quantum of salary will provide clarity to the wife about how much money she can have for household and personal expenses.

2. Show interest, split financial responsibility
If your husband does not share financial information, it is possible that at the start of the relationship, you did not evince any interest in financial transactions. If you want to change the status quo, have a conversation about it with the spouse. It is important to not only display interest, but also split financial responsibilities as per your individual skills. If you are good with investments, take on the responsibility, leaving the tasks of earning and paying bills to the husband. If investing is not your forte, you could handle the household budget and payment of bills, leaving investments to the spouse.

3. Get this information
If the husband is not sharing information out of habit or laziness, not malice, make sure you seek it from him periodically. Both the partners should be in the know about important financial aspects because if one were to pass away, the other should not be left clueless. While it is not important that you communicate on a day-to-day basis, both should be on the same page when it comes to goals and budgeting. Make sure that you know the accounts and passwords of all online and offline saving and investment accounts. You should also know about the investments in your or your spouse’s name, and have access to original documents of all insurance policies, be it life, health, vehicle or house. Finally, ensure access to will and property documents, essential for smooth transition of assets.

4. If husband refuses
If you have tried to talk to your husband about the need to share crucial financial information, and he is reluctant to do so or refuses outright, try to seek the help of a mediator. This person can be a trusted confidant or older relative, respected by both spouses, who can help clear the impasse. If this doesn’t work, approach a financial adviser, who can take an objective and pragmatic stance on the need to share financial details. If this, too, fails, seek a marriage counseller as a last resort because the issues and fissures are clearly deeper, involving your marriage, not merely your finances.

IF YOU HAVE A WEALTH WHINE, WRITE TO US…
All of us have been in a financial dilemma when it comes to relationships. How do you say no to a friend who wants you to invest in his new business venture? Should you take a loan from your married brother? Are you concerned about your wife’s impulse buying? If you have any such concerns that are hard to resolve, write in to us at [email protected] with ‘Wealth Whines’ as the subject.

Disclaimer: The advice in this column is not from a licensed healthcare professional and should not be construed as psychological counselling, therapy or medical advice. ET Wealth and the writer will not be responsible for the outcome of the suggestions made in the column.

[“source=economictimes.indiatimes”]

Arguing about money? A finance expert says these 5 common mistakes could ruin your relationship

We learn about money in school, but not about how to talk about it — and yet, it’s one of the of biggest reasons why people argue in relationships.

One dynamic we often see in relationships is when one person is a spender, and the other is a saver. The spender might have years’ worth of credit card debt or student loans, while the saver might have good credit and minimal or no debt. When two people have opposing views on finances, it can easily lead to conflict.

The first (and most crucial) step to avoiding a relationship disaster is to simply talk about it. When that moment comes, make sure you avoid these five common mistakes:

1. Bad timing

Timing is everything. If one partner seems particularly stressed after work, it might not be the right time to bombard them with bills and deadlines. Finding the right time is crucial to have the most productive conversation. You know your partner better than anyone, so pick a time when you know they’ll be the most receptive. This will make the discussion more productive.

2. Talking about the wrong things

When couples argue over finances, it’s typically because of what hasn’tbeen discussed — plans that were not communicated, expectations that were not explained and assumptions that went unspoken. Simply addressing your concerns can prevent a lot of these arguments. While you might touch on some uncomfortable topics, it’ll hopefully lead to a deep and fruitful conversation about things like your hopes for the future, retirement goals, worries, dream splurges, and so on.

Self-made millionaire Ramit Sethi: Here's why you should spend a lot of money on your wedding

Self-made millionaire Ramit Sethi: Here’s why you should spend a lot of money on your wedding

3. Hiding and lying about money

According to a recent GOBankingRates survey, about a quarter of Americans lie to their partner about their finances. Needless to say, this can be a major source of contention. Whether it’s about your income, spending habits, credit score or income, when you lie to your partner, you’re also lying to yourself. The saying “what you don’t know can’t hurt you” doesn’t apply to a healthy financial relationship. Being honest with yourself and your partner is one of the easiest ways to avoid arguments and hurting each other’s feelings.

4. Being a crappy listener

What’s the point of having a conversation if you’re both distracted and constantly interrupting each other? Instead of making your partner feel defensive or argumentative, let them know you’re completely present. Make eye contact and put the phones away. Another tip is to repeat back what you heard to your partner from time to time. It shows that you’re paying attention and ensures that you understood them correctly.

5. Having a closed mind

We all value money differently. What one person considers a bargain, the other might call expensive. The goal isn’t to judge your partner’s actions and behaviors, it’s to have a clearer understanding of where they’re coming from. A discussion about money is a discussion about values. When you know what your partner values, you can be a bit more compassionate about their decisions. And sometimes, you can simply agree to disagree.

[“source=cnbc”]