Article 35-A: Tension mounts in J&K ahead of SC hearing

Image result for Article 35-A: Tension mounts in J&K ahead of SC hearingPalpable tension is building up in different parts of Kashmir valley in the run up to the crucial hearing of Article 35-A in the Supreme Court next week.

The apex court is hearing a bunch of petitions in the matter, including the one filed by NGO ‘We the Citizens’ seeking quashing of article 35-A, which confers special status to permanent residents of Jammu and Kashmir.

Article 35A, was incorporated in the Constitution by a 1954 Presidential Order. The regional mainstream political parties, including the National Conference (NC) and the People’s Democratic Party (PDP), have opposed the move.

Anticipating more trouble on ground zero, the state government Saturday launched massive crackdown against separatists, Jamaat-e-Islami activists  and several others by carrying out nocturnal raids on their premises.

Meanwhile, to contain public anger and handle law and order situation centre also rushed additional 100 companies by air to further beef up security ‘bandobast’ in the region.

The move triggered endless rounds of speculations  in different parts of Kashmir valley as local residents in the valley and mainstream politicians linked it with the emerging security scenario in the aftermath of terror strike on a CRPF convoy in which 40 CRPF personnel were killed.

To register their protest against the detention of Yasin Malik and  Jamaat Chief Ameer Abdul Hamid Fayaz the joint resistance leadership (JRL) comprising Syed Ali Geelani,  Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Muhammad Yasin Malik issued a shutdown call for Sunday.

In a statement issued on Saturday, JRL said the “arbitrary” arrest of JKLF chairman Yasin Malik and the “mass crackdown and illegal detention” of more than 150 Jamat-e-Islami cadre and leadership including its Ameer Abdul Hamid Fayaz in nocturnal raids across the valley looks to be not only part of the continued policy of “suppression of pro-self-determination leadership and narrative, but in the case of hearing of 35A in Supreme Court most likely on Monday, an indication of what may be expected.”

Several mainstream politicians also reacted strongly to these developments on ground zero.

Former chief minister and Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) president, Mehbooba Mufti Saturday said the ‘arbitrary’ moves will only precipitate matters in Jammu and Kashmir.

Mehbooba in a tweet while reacting on arrest of Hurriyat leaders and workers of Jamaat said under what legal grounds are their arrests justified?, saying “You can imprison a person but not his ideas.”

“In the past 24 hours, Hurriyat leaders & workers of Jamaat organisation have been arrested. Fail to understand such an arbitrary move which will only precipitate matters in J&K. Under what legal grounds are their arrests justified? You can imprison a person but not his ideas,” Mehbooba tweeted.

Hurriyat Conference (M) chairman, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq also condemned nocturnal crackdown on JKLF chief  Yasin Malik and Jamat-e-Islami leadership and cadres.

In a tweet, Mirwaiz said such illegal and coercive measures against Kashmiris are futile and will not change realities on ground, saying that force and intimidation will only worsen the situation.

“Strongly condemn the nocturnal crackdown on Jamat-e-Islami leadership and cadres and the arrest of Yasin Malik. Such illegal and coercive measures against Kashmiris are futile and will not change realities on ground. Force and intimidation will only worsen the situation,” Mirwaiz tweeted.

Peoples Conference Chairman and former cabinet minister Sajjad Lone tweeted, “Gov seems to be on an arrest spree. Just a word of caution. Large scale arrests took place in 1990. Leaders were ferried to Jodhpur and many jails across the country. Things worsened. This is a tried tested and failed model. Please desist from it. It won’t work.Things will worsen”.

Authorities in Srinagar have ordered imposition of restrictions under section 144 of CrPC within the territorial jurisdictons of Khanyar, Rainawari, Nowhatta, Safakadal and MR Gunj police stations of the district on Sunday. The restrictions have been imposed as a precautionary measure to avoid any untoward incident.

Local residents, in panic mode are stocking ration supplies and other essential items like Petrol and medicines to sustain themselves for longer duration.

Reacting to the situation former Chief Minister Omar Abdullah tweeted, “People in the valley, especially the cities & towns, are taking everything said or done as a sign that some big trouble is just around the corner. People are hoarding food & fuel. Some government orders are adding to the sense of panic”.

[“source=dailypioneer”]

This Article Is Fake News. But It’s Also The Work of AI

Image result for This Article Is Fake News. But It’s Also The Work of AIThe use of fake news stories for political disinformation has become a major concern for governments around the world in the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The Federal Bureau of Investigation concluded Russia used false news reports, spread through social media, to try to sway voters. Writing these stories still needed someone to sit behind a keyboard.

Now OpenAI, a non-profit artificial intelligence research group in San Francisco, has unveiled a machine learning algorithm that can generate coherent text, including fake news articles, after being given just a small sample to build on. The algorithm can be tuned to imitate the writing style of the sample text.

Here’s an example of the system at work that OpenAI provided. The system was only given the first two sentences, which were written by a human:

A train carriage containing controlled nuclear materials was stolen in Cincinnati today. Its whereabouts are unknown.

And this is the rest of the news article that the AI wrote, with no human guidance:

The incident occurred on the downtown train line, which runs from Covington and Ashland stations.

In an email to Ohio news outlets, the U.S. Department of Energy said it is working with the Federal Railroad Administration to find the thief.

“The theft of this nuclear material will have significant negative consequences on public and environmental health, our workforce and the economy of our nation,” said Tom Hicks, the U.S. Energy Secretary, in a statement. “Our top priority is to secure the theft and ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

The stolen material was taken from the University of Cincinnati’s Research Triangle Park nuclear research site, according to a news release from Department officials.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission did not immediately release any information.

According to the release, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Security is leading that team’s investigation.

“The safety of people, the environment and the nation’s nuclear stockpile is our highest priority,” Hicks said. “We will get to the bottom of this and make no excuses.

Because of its potential to be misused for creating disinformation, OpenAI said it had chosen not to make the most powerful versions of its algorithm available for public use nor was it publishing the source code and training data used to create the software.

 

[“source=fortune”]

Recapping the saga of a misogynistic beer article that enraged the brewing world this week

There are stages to controversies in the social media age. First, the scandal breaks. Then it spreads. Criticism rains down on the perceived offender from across the internet. A few beats later, that person emerges publicly to defend themselves. The public generally rejects such an apology or criticizes the apology itself. Eventually, heads roll and/or the public moves on. End scene.

The craft beer world has moved through precisely those steps this week. A few days ago, an article published on the front page of regional beer publication Great Lakes Brewing News began making the social-media rounds. The article, which ran under the byline of Great Lakes Brewing News publisher Bill Metzger, ostensibly was about Scotch ale and cask ale, but its sexist tone drew swift and forceful criticism. Choice lines from the 2,800-word hybrid article/essay, which was written in the first-person, include: “In the age of #metoo, the pendulum has swung too far. One aggressive move and a man’s career can derail. I feel the walls closing around me, my room to move shrinking. My instincts to bed every woman I see are reducing from a king-sized mattress to a cot, the size of which I only remember from a tour in Iraq.”

You can read more excerpts via The Buffalo News, including the article’s repeated mentions of using alcohol to lower women’s sexual inhibitions.

When I first saw screenshots of the article, I blinked slowly. How was any of this about beer? How did this get published on the front page of… anything? What does Bill Metzger have to say for himself? Other beer writers and breweries themselves were equally upset, with some who’d advertised in the publication condemning the piece and withdrawing future ads. (Metzger’s Brewing News company publishes other regional beer newspapers as well.) Some breweries burned the publication in effigy.

So, we’ve arrived at the scandal stage where the accused emerges to defend themselves. Per a screenshot posted by the creative director for Chicago’s Pipeworks brewery, who criticized the article on Twitter, Bill Metzger responded to her with the below message which includes the by-now-a-punchline phrase: “I’m sorry you were offended.”

A statement on Great Lakes Brewing News’ Facebook page states the article was intended as parody and does not reflect the views of the author. Metzger’s statement continues: “Nowhere in this piece is there an endorsement of misogyny nor hatred. It is a simple parody of a disgusting attitude that I have seen often. We have been publishing the occasional piece that does anger people as some topics seem too toxic to discuss rationally. And it most certainly does not reflect my views; those who actually know me beyond a few articles written and/or published know that much.”

Forbes beer writer Tara Nurin, who has long covered women’s role in beer, spoke to Metzger by phone and found him “genuinely and deeply pained that his admittedly misbegotten attempt to highlight the problem of sexual harassment and assault in brewing has backfired so badly.” Still, she and other beer writers ultimately reject his parody defense, with writer Robin LeBlanc calling the whole mess “a special kind of trainwreck.” This beer writer agrees.

There’s never a good time for failed satire about sexual assault, but Metzger’s timing is especially bad. Earlier this month, the CEO of Actual Brewing in Columbus, Ohio, stepped down amid an investigation into allegations he repeatedly sexually assaulted multiple women. Last year, Jackson Hole, Wyoming-based Melvin Brewing faced backlash from retailers and customers after one of its brewers inappropriately touched an employee of another brewery, bringing to light what some called a larger “bro culture” within Melvin.

Though women in any male-dominated industry face challenges, those challenges can be especially dangerous when your daily job functions involve alcohol. I’ve seen the beer industry take important steps to make itself safer and more welcoming to women and minorities, but as recent stories of assault and discrimination illustrate, there is still much work to be done. That women’s painful efforts to share their #metoo experiences would be the object of abysmal satire only prove how long the road will be.

 

[“source=thetakeout”]

 

Report: What’s A Pretty Lady Like You Doing Around An Article Like This?

THEONION.COM—Remarking with equal parts surprise and delight that of all the news stories in the world, you started reading this one, sources couldn’t help but wonder what a pretty little lady like you was doing hanging around an article like this. According to experts, you should probably just run along back to the front page where it’s safer—but then again, where’s the fun in that? Sure, there’s a lot of, let’s say, shadyarticles around here, but most of them are harmless, and a girl can still learn a lot hanging around them. Moreover, while we can’t deny that something about you caught our eye from across the lede line, we can’t help thinking that maybe it was fate that brought you here. While admitting that can’t be corroborated, many in similar circumstances found themselves unable to completely dismiss the idea of kismet altogether. “There’s nowhere you can be that isn’t where you’re meant to be,” John Lennon once said of this sort of situation. Furthermore, sources want to know: So what about you? Do you believe in destiny? We apologize if that is a silly question for a news source to ask; besides, it’s clear that you deserve better than this article. After all, in most cases such as this, an attractive and accomplished lady such as yourself can count on all sorts of classier, glossier publications vying for your attention. However, those close to the issue are speculating that perhaps you really are different than all the others. This newspaper is not trying to be forward, but, maybe you would like to get together for another article with us some time? At press time, she’s gone, just like that, and maybe it was never meant to be.

 

[“source=theonion”]

 

This Wellness Article Is Going Viral For All The Wrong Reasons

Image result for This Wellness Article Is Going Viral For All The Wrong Reasons

Trump. Brexit. Climate change. It’s only two weeks into 2019 and we’ve already had spiders falling from the sky.

It’s understandable to crave a little bit of self-care, a trend clearly reflected in our Internet histories. Search results for “wellness” has almost doubled over the past 10 years, with a particularly noticeable spike in February 2017.

But while we credit the wellness movement for encouraging people to prioritize their mental wellbeing, we have to admit, at a certain point, it goes way too far. That point is gushing about the life-changing benefits of hyperbaric oxygen chambers, human chargers, and pink coconut water. Because white coconut water, apparently, is just not hydrating enough.

These are just a few of the frankly bizarre wellness practices mentioned in a recent Times article, which has gone viral for all the wrong best reasons.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Sarah@sbl1976

There’s a “wellness” article in The Times today that has finally convinced me the people won’t live longer it’ll just feel like it. Look how BUSY these 3 are, all before 9am

12K

2:52 PM – Jan 12, 2019
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Sarah@sbl1976
Replying to @sbl1976

My favourite is the dude who thinks we are blessed because Pret sell charcoal

1,797

2:55 PM – Jan 12, 2019
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Not all of the suggestions made in the article are too wild (think: green smoothies and blue-light blocking shades), but others make Goop’s hormone-regulating jade eggs sound vaguely plausible. Take, for example, nail beds, quartz crystals, and salt lamps said to absorb radioactivity.

One person recalls going barefoot to receive electrons from the Earth.

ɴᴀᴛᴀʟɪᴇ ✈ London, Zurich@ScarletCatalie
Replying to @sbl1976 @WordMercenary

Sure are a lot of Brand Names going on for being in touch with one’s self

Robbie D. Keyring@rdkieran

Now available: Electrons™ by The Earth

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5:54 PM – Jan 12, 2019
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Another respondent reports waking up extra early to ensure he has time to rehydrate, meditate, and, erm, re-charge with his HumanCharger before heading off to work. These sleek-looking devices promise to increase energy levels and mood and prevent jet lag by channeling a bright light through your ears, straight to the light-sensitive areas of the brain. It receives mixed reviews on Amazon and the science is murky at best, as one Guardian reviewer puts it. Experts suggest it works just as well as a placebo.

Lily@LilyMWrites
Replying to @sbl1976 @mushenska

I just can’t get past the HumanCharger. A BED is a human charger!

592

4:22 PM – Jan 12, 2019
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[“source=iflscience”]

Kerala nun slams article against her in newspaper associated with catholic church

She invited the wrath of Church leadership for demanding the arrest of rape accused Bishop Franco Mulakkal

A catholic nun, who took part in a street protest here against a rape-accused bishop some months ago, continued to draw flak with a pro-church daily slamming her on Thursday for violating norms, even as she dubbed it as an “attempt to humiliate” her.

This comes days after the Franciscan Clarist Congregation (FCC) served a notice to Sister Lucy Kalappura accusing her of leading a life, which was against the “principles of religious life“.

The warning notice was issued after the nun had posted her photo wearing a ‘Salwar Kameez’ on her Facebook page, bought a car and published a poetry collection, even after she was denied permission by the church authorities.

Reacting to the article published in the Malayalam newspaper, the nun said she had no regret over whatever she had done.

“I am a person observing all vows and I have no regret in whatever I have done,” the nun, belonging to FCC, said.

“The article is an attempt to humiliate me through the media. But, I will not give up,” she said.

The daily predominately, run by Catholic priests and lay persons, carried a lengthy article in its editorial page against the actions of the nun without naming her.

The article, penned by a Noble Parakkal, accused the nun of insulting the church through her acts, taking part in the protest against the bishop without seeking permission, posting her photo on social media and grabbing media attention by spreading lies.

Accuses male priests

Sister Lucy had invited the wrath of the Church leadership by participating in a street protest here by five nuns belonging to the Catholic religious order Missionaries of Jesus demanding the arrest of Bishop Franco Mulakkal, who was accused of raping a nun.

The nun said the article accused her of violating the law and disciplines of the church at a time when several male priests were continuing to live an “unethical” life, she said.

In its notice sent earlier this week, the FCC had accused Sister Lucy Kalapura belonging to FCC’s St Mary’s province in Mananthavady, of leading a life, which was against the “principles of religious life” and the rule of congregation.

The congregation termed as “grave violations” a nun taking license, buying a car, taking a loan for it and publishing a book spending money without permission and knowledge of her superiors.

The provincial superior had denied permission to Sister Lucy to publish her collection of poems.

Book publishing

She, however, published her book “Snehamazhayil” without seeking permission from her superiors.

The congregation had also called as “grave scandal” the Nun participating in discussions in TV news channels and writing articles for non-Christian newspapers “making false accusations against Catholic leadership and belittling it.”

[“source=thehindubusinessline”]