Reliance Jio launches mobile browser for Android, promises fast speed, low data usage

Reliance Jio,Jio Web browser,Jio Mobile Browser

After Xiaomi, Reliance Jio has launched a standalone mobile browser for Android users in India. Called JioBrowser, Reliance’s new browser is promised to deliver faster speed and consume lesser data. The app supports up to eight Indian languages, for now.

Reliance JioBrowser: How to download and install

You can download Reliance JioBrowser from Google Play Store. The application is roughly 5MB in size and is compatible with phones running on Android 5.0 and above. The app has over 1,000,000+ installs with 4.4 average rating. Download link.

Reliance JioBrowser: Interface

Reliance Jio’s new mobile browser is not very different from other lightweight mobile browsers such as UC Web. While the application UI is smooth and easy-to-use, focus is rather on the content than browsing.

The home page features a Google News-like feed with content from different publications. Users can add more categories to the News Feed. The interface seems to be inspired by Google’s Material Design, which is certainly not a negative. It’s neat and easy to get started.

Reliance JioBrowser: Top features

Voice search: Reliance Jio has integrated Google’s voice search in its search bar. The searched content (audio) is saved to the registered Google account on your phone. Google Assistant is also available on Chrome and Xiaomi’s Mint browser.

External share: JioBrowser users can share web pages with friends on other applications. You need to tap on three dots menu on the right top corner > tap on share icon > choose the app you want to share with.

JioBrowser consumes lesser data while web browsing (Screenshot/Jio)

Privacy, security: Like any other mobile browser, JioBrowser allows you to browse the web in incognito mode. Under the Settings, users can also clear cache, browser cookies and web storage.

What’s missing on JioBrowser

Dark Mode: At the moment, JioBrowser does not support native Dark Mode feature. Dark Mode inverts the white theme into black or grey-tone to make the content more comfortable to eyes.

Multi-tasking: Since it’s a stripped down version of a main browser, don’t expect dynamic features like Read Mode or customise the window panels. Users, however, can increase the text size of the content within the application.

[“source-“hindustantimes”]

With more tariffs, US-China trade outlook looks grim, says data

US,China,Trade

With seven weeks to go until a deadline that could see the U.S. ramp up tariffs on Chinese goods once again, the economic damage wrought by the months-long trade war is becoming clearer even as a pathway to a lasting resolution remains muddied.

While Chinese goods going to the U.S. initially held up in the face of higher tariffs due to so-called front-loading, their value slumped in the final quarter of 2018, according to the latest available data. For sales going the other direction, the crunch was more immediate. In both cases, further declines are on the cards if the talks fail to produce a resolution.

Negotiators from both the U.S. and China expressed optimism after mid-level talks wrapped in Beijing this week, boosting sentiment across global markets. Still, the path forward remains unclear: Another round of talks hasn’t been scheduled, and the government shutdown in the U.S. has dominated President Donald Trump’s attention.

Both Trump and Chinese Vice President Wang Qishan were slated to appear later this month at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, providing an opportunity for high-level dialogue. But the shutdown may yet prevent Trump’s appearance, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

Companies in both countries just want to see a deal get done.

“We urge both governments to use the time remaining in the 90-day negotiating period to make tangible progress on the important issues at the core of the current dispute: equal treatment of foreign companies in China, as well as China’s intellectual property and technology transfer policies,” said Jake Parker, vice president of China operations at the U.S.-China Business Council in Beijing. “Uncertainty is bad for business.”

As evidence mounts by the day that the slowdown in China’s economy is worsening, policy makers in Beijing are focusing on getting rid of the duties that Trump has leveled on Chinese goods since last year, according to a former high-level official briefed on the government’s thinking. U.S. officials appear to want to maintain the pressure of tariffs, the official said.

China and the U.S. will move ahead with trade talks as scheduled, Ministry of Commerce Spokesman Gao Feng told reporters in Beijing at a regular weekly briefing Thursday, without giving any further details over when they would take place. He wouldn’t confirm reports that Vice Premier Liu He will visit the U.S. soon to meet U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer.

Meanwhile, the economic risks are growing. Economists now see the threat of deflation in China after producer price inflation slowed sharply in December, to the weakest pace since 2016.

That would not only squeeze corporate profitability at home, but also put pressure on global price gains, as export prices usually follow those at factory gate. With industrial output and retail sales growth both at the weakest levels in a decade, China’s woes would also mean softer demand for imports, hurting other economies including the U.S.

A reduction in Chinese imports of U.S. goods came quickly after the retaliatory imposition of tariffs, the data show. Without a breakthrough in talks, U.S. corporations are likely to experience a deepening decline in their Chinese sales, with Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts even seeing an “informal boycott” in place.

The full year numbers will look somewhat different, partly because China has resumed purchases of U.S. soybeans and other goods. Even if the current truce is made permanent and the tariffs are eventually rolled back, the damage to many companies may already be done.

China’s trade data for the full year of 2018 is due to be released on Jan. 14, and economists see year-on-year export growth slowing in December from November.

The Trump administration is pushing for a way to make sure China delivers on its commitments in any deal. Trump and Xi have given their officials until March 1 to reach an accord on “structural changes” to China’s economy on issues such as the forced transfer of American technology, intellectual-property rights and non-tariff barriers.

“The hard work of addressing structural issues to create a level playing field in China do not appear to have been resolved,” said Lester Ross, a policy committee chief at the American Chamber of Commerce and also partner-in-charge at the Beijing office of law firm WilmerHale. “And China going forward will likely still want to increase the diversification of its sources of supply even for agricultural commodities.”

The 90-day time frame is a tight window in which to nail down deep changes to China’s economic model, reforms which past U.S. administrations advocated for years and U.S. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle support.

Even so, progress in talks signals that an interim deal that suspends new tariff hikes is possible, according to Louis Kuijs, head of Asia economics at Oxford Economics in Hong Kong.

“The earlier escalation of the trade conflict between the U.S. and China and souring bilateral relations appear to have given way to a more conciliatory approach since early December,” he wrote in a note Thursday. “However, we do not see the U.S. fully removing the specter of tariff hikes any time soon.”

[“source-“hindustantimes”]

Facebook Privacy Debacle Continues as Popular Android Apps Found Sharing Data Without User Permission

Facebook Privacy Debacle Continues as Popular Android Apps Found Sharing Data Without User PermissionA bunch of popular apps on Android could be putting your privacy at risk, according to a study conducted by Privacy International. 61 percent of the apps that were tested were sending data to Facebook as soon as the user opened the app. The data was being shared even before the user was asked for their permission. This happened even if a user didn’t have a Facebook account or wasn’t logged into one.

Privacy International studied 34 popular Android apps to see if they send data to Facebook without a user’s permission. The information sent to Facebook included the app’s title, the user’s unique Android ID, and other app analytics.

However, some apps like Kayak were found sending sensitive data to Facebook. This included flight searches, travel timeline if children were being accompanied, and all the destinations that a user searched for. Most of these popular apps are available for free on the Google Play Store.

Some of the apps that were a part of the study included MyFitnessPal, Duolingo, Family Locator, Kayak, My Talking Tom, Shazam, Spotify, and several other popular apps.

The move is being seen as a clear violation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which was set up in May this year. Under the new regulation, mobile apps cannot collect or share a user’s data without their permission.

Privacy International claims that the data collected from users’ devices can be combined to connect activities, interests, behaviours, and other activities of a user. Facebook could use this data, later on, to serve ads based on some highly specific demographics.

While Facebook asks app developers to make sure they can lawfully collect, use, or share their users’ data before sending it to Facebook, the default implementation of the Facebook SDK enabled automatic transmission of event data to Facebook.

After GDPR came into effect, Facebook did release a new feature in its SDK to delay the collection of logged events until a user has given permission to the app. But this was around 35 days after GDPR was implemented and currently works only on Facebook’s SDK version 4.34 and above.

Privacy International has put up a detailed analysis of its study on its website. The group has released details of how each app sends data to Facebook along with responses from each app developer.

This isn’t the first time Android apps have been found to share user data. Earlier in October this year, a report claimed that 88 percent of free apps on Android share data with Google.

[“source-ndtv”]

Facebook Privacy Debacle Continues as Popular Android Apps Found Sharing Data Without User Permission

Facebook Privacy Debacle Continues as Popular Android Apps Found Sharing Data Without User Permission

A bunch of popular apps on Android could be putting your privacy at risk, according to a study conducted by Privacy International. 61 percent of the apps that were tested were sending data to Facebook as soon as the user opened the app. The data was being shared even before the user was asked for their permission. This happened even if a user didn’t have a Facebook account or wasn’t logged into one.

Privacy International studied 34 popular Android apps to see if they send data to Facebook without a user’s permission. The information sent to Facebook included the app’s title, the user’s unique Android ID, and other app analytics.

However, some apps like Kayak were found sending sensitive data to Facebook. This included flight searches, travel timeline if children were being accompanied, and all the destinations that a user searched for. Most of these popular apps are available for free on the Google Play Store.

Some of the apps that were a part of the study included MyFitnessPal, Duolingo, Family Locator, Kayak, My Talking Tom, Shazam, Spotify, and several other popular apps.

The move is being seen as a clear violation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which was set up in May this year. Under the new regulation, mobile apps cannot collect or share a user’s data without their permission.

Privacy International claims that the data collected from users’ devices can be combined to connect activities, interests, behaviours, and other activities of a user. Facebook could use this data, later on, to serve ads based on some highly specific demographics.

While Facebook asks app developers to make sure they can lawfully collect, use, or share their users’ data before sending it to Facebook, the default implementation of the Facebook SDK enabled automatic transmission of event data to Facebook.

After GDPR came into effect, Facebook did release a new feature in its SDK to delay the collection of logged events until a user has given permission to the app. But this was around 35 days after GDPR was implemented and currently works only on Facebook’s SDK version 4.34 and above.

Privacy International has put up a detailed analysis of its study on its website. The group has released details of how each app sends data to Facebook along with responses from each app developer.

This isn’t the first time Android apps have been found to share user data. Earlier in October this year, a report claimed that 88 percent of free apps on Android share data with Google.

[“source-ndtv”]