Uri-The Surgical Strike box office day 4: Vicky Kaushal, Yami Gautam’s film is a hit, collects Rs 46 crore

Uri: The Surgical Strike,Uri: The Surgical Strike box office,Vicky Kaushal

Actor Vicky Kaushal’s first solo release of the year Uri: The Surgical Strike has registered a impressive performance at the box office. The film opened a bit better than what was expected, with a collection of Rs 8 crore. It has now made a total of Rs 46 crore in just four days.

Film trade analyst Taran Adarsh also shared the box office figures of the film on Twitter. He tweeted, “#UriTheSurgicalStrike is unshakable… Excellent on Day 4… Higher than Day 1… Will cross Rs 50 cr today… Trending better than #Raazi, #Stree and #BadhaaiHo… Fri 8.20 cr, Sat 12.43 cr, Sun 15.10 cr, Mon 10.51 cr. Total: Rs 46.24 cr. India biz. #Uri #HowsTheJosh.”He added in another tweet, “#UriTheSurgicalStrike emerges the FIRST HIT of 2019… Indeed, 2019 has started with high josh… Sets the BO on (fire) on Day 3… Packs a solid total in its opening weekend… Fri 8.20 cr, Sat 12.43 cr, Sun 15.10 cr. Total: Rs 35.73 cr. India biz. #Uri #HowsTheJosh.”Directed by Aditya Dhar, the film is inspired by the 2016 surgical strike carried out by India in Pakistan. Vicky plays an Indian Army major in the film while Yami Gautam, Mohit Raina, Kirti Kulhari and Paresh Rawal also have prominent roles in the film.

On being asked about the film’s prospects of joining the Rs 100 crore club, film exhibitor Akshaye Rathi had told HT, “The possibility is certainly there but it depends on how entertaining the script is. If the script is engaging enough, anything can happen. The onus for a film’s success also lies on the writer and director of the film. If it will make it to the Rs 100 crore club depends how well it is written, narrated and directed.”

[“source-“hindustantimes”]

Yes, you still need to pay your student loans during the shutdown — but you could hit some snags

Despite the partial government shutdown, it should (mostly) be business as usual for students relying on federal student loans to afford college and borrowers repaying them.

The Department of Education remains fully funded, which means its contractors are still collecting student loan payments and the agency is still dispersing grants and federal student loans. Still, students, borrowers and schools may experience some hiccups for tasks that require information from another agency experiencing greater impacts from the shutdown, like the IRS.

“It’s the other departments that are running into some issues,” said Mark Kantrowitz, the publisher of savingforcollege.com and a financial aid expert.

Here’s what you need to know:

Borrowers repaying their student loans

Perhaps the most important thing that borrowers who are repaying their student loans should know is that the shutdown doesn’t affect their student loan bills.

Borrowers “should be operating as if everything is normal and there is no disruption at all,” said Justin Draeger, the president of the National Association of Financial Aid Administrators, a professional association for financial aid officers. In other words: “Don’t stop paying your loans,” he says.

Still, the shutdown could impact some borrowers trying to manage their debt. Borrowers who want to take advantage of the government’s income-driven repayment plans, which allow them to pay off their debt as a percentage of their income, need to show proof of income to their student loan servicer. They also need to recertify their income every year to stay on the plans.

The IRS, which has had many of its duties curtailed due to the shutdown, typically plays a role in both cases. Usually, borrowers will use the IRS data retrieval tool, which electronically transfers tax information into their income driven repayment plan application. Department of Education officials say the tool is operating as normal. The IRS did not respond immediately to a request for comment.

Borrowers applying for an income-driven repayment plan or re-certifying their income for an IDR plan should try to use the data retrieval tool, Kantrowitz said. If for some reason, they hit a snag — the tools don’t always run perfectly, he noted — under normal circumstances a borrower would download their tax transcript from the IRS and file a paper application.

But the tax transcript service is currently down. Officials at the Department of Education and the IRS told Politico the outage isn’t due to the shutdown and they expect the tool to be back up on January 14. In the meantime, while the shutdown persists, borrowers trying to get their tax information will likely struggle to find someone to take their calls at the IRS, Kantrowitz said.

Borrowers whose circumstances have changed since they last filed their tax return — information that won’t be reflected in the data retrieval tool — can use other documentation to prove their income, like pay stubs or a letter from their employer. But because those documents typically show net income and not gross income — which is available through tax documents and on which the calculation for income-driven repayment plans are usually based — borrowers’ loan payments could wind up being higher, Kantrowitz said.

Students applying for and receiving aid

The lack of availability of tax transcripts is also causing a snag for some students applying for aid, experts say. Roughly 30% of students who fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, are flagged for verification each year, a process that requires them to prove their income. Typically these students use a tax transcript to verify their income.

“Basically there’s a big bottleneck in the process at this point,” said David Baime, the senior vice president for government relations and policy analysis at the American Association of Community Colleges.

Baime said his organization has heard from its member schools “with great concern” about students unable to complete their FAFSA due to the tax transcript issue. Unfortunately, this issue is likely affecting students who need the funds the most — college officials say they observe that low-income students are more likely to be flagged for verification.

“The bottom line is that our colleges — and their students more importantly — are really in many places in a very difficult situation in terms of financing,” Baime said.

Again, the agencies say this delay isn’t related to the government shutdown, but is the result of scheduled maintenance.

Students who find themselves in this situation should contact the schools they’re working with to find out what they need to submit and when they need to submit it, Draeger said. In some cases, colleges are working with students to allow them to start the semester in the absence of financing until the issues are resolved, Baime said.

Questions on the FAFSA that require interactions with other agencies are also causing hiccups for some students and schools. In order to qualify for federal financial aid, male students need to register for the draft. The FAFSA typically performs a database match with the Selective Service Administration to make sure required students have registered, but right now that match is failing, Draeger said. Colleges are able to look students up individually to make sure they’re registered, he said.

Despite these challenges, for the most part, students shouldn’t see any effect on their financial aid during the shutdown, Draeger said.

“The Department [of Education] is funded, federal student aid dollars are flowing,” he said.

Government workers affected by the shutdown

Though most student loan borrowers aren’t impacted by the shutdown, those who belong to the group of government workers that are furloughed and not receiving a paycheck may be struggling to make their monthly payments.

The Department of Education advises borrowers for whom that’s the case to contact their student loan servicer to discuss their repayment options.

Adam Minsky, a Boston-based student loan lawyer, suggests government workers who are furloughed and on an income-driven plan apply to have their monthly payments reduced based on their changed circumstances. If possible, they should resist entering a forbearance — a temporary status that pauses payments, but where interest accrues.

Entering forbearance could wind up costing borrowers more in the long run both because interest capitalizes at the end of a forbearance period and because any time spent in forbearance delays progress towards Public Service Loan Forgiveness, which allows borrowers working in public service, including for the federal government, to have their loans forgiven after at least 10 years of payments.

[“source=marketwatch”]

India’s Retaliatory Tariffs To Hit US Exports Worth $ 900 Millon: Report

India's Retaliatory Tariffs To Hit US Exports Worth $ 900 Millon: ReportWashington: 

India’s proposed retaliatory tariffs against US agricultural products including apples, almonds and lentils will have an adverse impact on American exports worth nearly $ 900 million, according to the latest Congressional report.

India last year announced higher import duties on many US products like apples, almonds, walnuts, chickpeas and lentils in retaliation to President Donald Trump’s decision to impose heavy tariffs on imported steel and aluminium items, a move that sparked fears of a global trade war.

However, India is the only major country which has been continuously postponed the implementation of the retaliatory tariffs despite announcing it more than six months ago.

In October last year, Trump described India as a “tariff king” as he reiterated his allegations that New Delhi has a high tariff rate on various American products.

India’s proposed retaliatory tariffs is far less than that by China on more than 800 American agricultural products which accounted for approximately $ 20.6 billion in exports to the US in 2017.

China is followed by Canada ($ 2.6 billion), Mexico ($ 2.5 billion), the European Union ($ 1 billion) and Turkey ($ 250 million) in slapping retaliatory tariffs on the agricultural products from the US.

Countries have imposed tariffs on American agricultural products to retaliate against actions the Trump administration took in March, 2018 to protect US steel and aluminum producers and in response to Chinese intellectual property rights and technology policies.

Since then, over 800 US food and agricultural products have been subject to retaliatory tariffs from China, the EU, Turkey, Canada and Mexico, the bipartisan Congressional Research Service (CRS) said in its report ‘Profiles and Effects of Retaliatory Tariffs on US Agricultural Exports’.

The CRS, an independent research wing of Congress, regularly prepares reports on various issues for the lawmakers to take informed decisions.

US exports of those products to the retaliating countries totaled $ 26.9 billion in 2017, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) export data.

It all started on March 23, 2018, when the Trump administration applied a 25 per cent tariff to all US steel imports and a 10 per cent tariff to all US aluminum imports, citing an investigation that showed national security concerns.

“Canada, China, Mexico, the EU and Turkey retaliated with tariffs on imports of US agricultural and food products and other goods.

“India has proposed retaliatory tariffs on US apples, almonds, walnuts, chickpeas and lentils, but it has delayed implementation pending ongoing negotiations with the Trump administration,” said the CRS.

Reports of CRS are prepared by independent experts for the lawmakers to make informed decisions and are not an official position of the US Congress.

In its report dated December 31, the CRS sad in response to the tariffs the Trump administration levied on US imports of steel and aluminum from India earlier this year, India has threatened to impose retaliatory tariffs on a handful of US agricultural and food products. The date for imposing these tariffs has been pushed back several times, and they are currently set to become effective on January 31, 2019.

“US exports of the targeted products were valued at USD 857 million in 2017, comprising 54 per cent of the $ 1.8 billion of total US agricultural exports to India. US almond growers, in particular, could feel the effects of India’s threatened tariffs should they enter into force,” said the CRS, a copy of which was obtained by PTI.

India ranked third as a destination for US apple exports in 2017, purchasing $ 97 million of US apples, or 10 per cent of the total exports.

“The Indian government proposes to apply a 30 per cent retaliatory tariff on imports of US apples on January 31, 2019,” the CRS said. Comparatively, US apple exports to Mexico and China are now subject to additional retaliatory tariffs of 20 per cent and 40 per cent respectively, raising the total tariff rates to 20 per cent and 50 per cent respectively.

The Trump administration has taken measures to ease the downside effects of the retaliatory tariffs on farmers and ranchers through a $ 12 billion trade aid package.

Under the initiative, USDA has committed to making direct payments to farmers of selected commodities subject to the tariffs, as well as buying up surplus quantities of some commodities and providing funding for additional trade promotion efforts.

[“source-ndtv”]