10 Marvel planners and journals to make you feel like an organized superhero

These inspiring and stylish Marvel planners and journals will help you stay inspired and work towards your goals and resolutions for 2019.

While it might be almost February, it’s still a good time to make resolutions and goals for the years. It’s also a perfect opportunity to evaluate the resolutions you made a month ago and see what you need to do to continue on with your plans for a successful 2019. One way to make keeping resolutions more exciting is to get organized and buy a journal and planner that will inspire you.

Simple things like having a notebook you love can help you keep track of your goals more efficiently. We’ve collected 10 Marvel-themed planners and journals that any MCU fan will love. You’ll be inspired by your favorite heroes to keep working hard when you use them!

Marvel: Spider-Man Hardcover Ruled Journal

We all know that “with great power, comes great responsibility,” and this planner will remind you of your own strength and power each day. You’re going to love being able to schedule out your days and be reminded of how Peter Parker was just a normal guy in Queens who became a hero. Maybe you can do your part to make your own hometown better, too!

Price: $17.06

Marvel Logo Journal

Sometimes the best way to get inspired to do great things is to be reminded of all of your favorite heroes. This journal is bold in black and red colors and features images of many Marvel characters. You’ll be able to write out your goals, thoughts, or whatever else you need to stay organized in this journal.

Price: $19.99

Marvel Studios 10th Anniversary Journal

It’s hard to believe that the MCU has been around for 10 years. This journal will remind you of how much good can come over time if you work hard and plan ahead. You’ll be reminded to think of your long-term goals when you use this journal to work on your resolutions. You can also use this sleek Iron Man pen when you do so to be further reminded of how one moment can bring to pass something extraordinary.

Price: $14.95

Moleskine Captain America Notebook

Captain America is a very inspiring and dedicated man. When you use this sturdy notebook, you’ll be reminded to work hard and try your best. You don’t want to let Cap down after all! This Moleskine notebook is the perfect place to keep track of fitness goals or career plans and be inspired by a picture of Captain America each time you do so.

Price: $24.95

Captain Marvel School Planner

Journals and notebooks can be perfect for a variety of purposes, but sometimes it’s best to have a more structured planner to help you design your days. This Captain Marvel school planner is marketed for kids, but it’s perfect for fans of any age. You’ll be inspired to go “higher, further, faster” when you use this planner to organize your life. Plus, you’ll love that it comes with stickers!

Price: $14.99

Groot Premium Journal

This Groot journal is adorable and sweet, and you’ll smile each time that you look at it. You can use this journal to write down any thoughts that inspire you or anything that makes you feel creative. You can also use it to doodle or work on art. Space is really the limit here! You are Groot!

Price: $17.43

Avengers: Infinity War Logo Journal

While Infinity War might have been rather traumatic, this journal with the Avengers logo is sleek and simple. You’ll be reminded of how powerful you can be if you team up with others around you to work towards a good end.

Price: $18.95

Black Panther School Planner

Black Panther is a film full of many inspiring people. T’Challa is a wise, gentle king, and his sister Shuri is a genius. You’ll be motivated to follow your dreams when you use this fun, colorful planner to work on your resolutions. You’re going to love using this planner to organize your life!

Price: $13.49

Grid Superheroes Hard Cover Journal

This notebook features images of the Avengers in their original comic book forms. The cover is colorful and attention-grabbing. If you leave it next to your bed, it will be easy to jot down your goals for the day. You’ll be cheered on by the images of your favorite superheroes fighting crime.

Price: $12.95

Deadpool Journal

Deadpool is a rather unconventional hero, so this notebook will remind you that you can do great things even if you’re a little different than the norm. This journal is ideal for writing down hilarious thoughts alongside your daily tasks and goals. Deadpool would be proud of you!

Price: $12.99

 

[“source=culturess”]

Scientific societies worry Plan S will make them shutter journals, slash services

An existential threat. That’s what scientific societies supported by journal subscriptions call Plan S. Introduced in September 2018 by European research funders and endorsed by others since then, the plan will require that grantees’ papers be immediately available free of charge. All publishers that charge subscriptions will be affected, but scientific societies fear they could be hit especially hard. One, the Genetics Society of America (GSA) in Rockville, Maryland, predicts worldwide adoption of Plan S could cut its net revenue from publishing by a third. Less drastic impacts on societies’ bottom lines might still force them to sell their journals to commercial publishers and cut back on activities supported by publishing, such as professional training and public outreach.

“We’re not seeing a sustainable, viable, nonprofit open-access model” if all funders back Plan S, says Tracey DePellegrin, executive director of GSA, which publishes two journals.

After accepting comments through 8 February, the plan’s architects expect to firm up details this spring. But the bottom line is clear: By 2024, Plan S funders will allow grantees to publish papers only on platforms that offer immediate open access and cap the fee that open-access publishers can charge a paper’s authors. Many journals now follow a hybrid model, publishing individual papers open access for a fee but deriving most of their income from subscriptions.

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Scientific publishing needs “a radical program” to promote full and immediate open access because progress has been too slow, argues Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission’s open-access envoy in Brussels, who is one of the architects of Plan S. The open-access movement began about 15 years ago, but by 2016, only about 20% of newly published research articles were open access.

Plan S’s requirements will disproportionately hurt the selective journals that many societies publish, says Fred Dylla, former executive director of the American Institute of Physics (AIP) in College Park, Maryland, who still advises AIP about its journals. Such journals typically have high costs per article, reflecting expenses for reviewing papers that are rejected; publishers worry Plan S’s fee cap, which has yet to be set, will be too low to cover the average cost per paper. What’s more, the societies typically have lower profit margins and a smaller economy of scale than do the commercial publishers that publish the majority of all journal articles. The largest, Elsevier, based in Amsterdam, publishes more than 2500 journal titles; scientific societies each publish at most a few dozen. (Science is published by a nonprofit scientific society, AAAS in Washington, D.C.; Science‘s news section is editorially independent of the journal and AAAS.)

Comprehensive data aren’t available, but a 2017 study by Universities UK, an advocacy group in London, estimated that for life science societies, publishing income funded about 40% of spending on other activities, whereas for physical science societies, the figure was closer to 20%. GSA’s two journals provide about 65% of the society’s total net revenues, financing other GSA programs that don’t make money. These include efforts to advocate for science funding and help early-career scientists, activities that could help researchers outside of the society’s members.

So far, 16 funders, most of them in Europe, have embraced Plan S, not enough to transform journal finances. U.S. government funders remain cool to the approach. But Plan S’s international momentum grew—along with the threat it poses to traditional publishing—in December 2018, when officials in China backed its open-access goals. If China follows through, Plan S could reduce publishers’ income by perhaps 15% under certain conditions, according to an estimate published last week by Delta Think, a consulting firm in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. That analysis doesn’t include the effect of the cap on author fees (also called article-processing charges), which could cut revenues further. The average fee for papers published in purely open-access journals in 2018 was about $1600, Delta Think has estimated.

GSA produces such a journal, G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, and is “actively preparing for an eventual open-access publishing landscape” for all articles, DePellegrin says. GSA’s other journal, Genetics, is hybrid. The society has already reduced costs. The revenue loss from global adoption of Plan S would force GSA to cut its services or sell the journals to a commercial publisher, she says. “The trade-offs are hard,” adds Mark Johnston, editor-in-chief of Genetics and a molecular geneticist at the University of Colorado in Denver.

One way society publishers could adapt to Plan S’s requirements: Publish more papers to bring in more author fees. But that strategy may not succeed. The PLOS family of open-access journals, which published nearly 25,000 papers in 2017, reported a $1.7 million operating loss that year. Another prominent open-access journal, eLife, was also in the red in 2017 despite its author fee of $2500 and subsidies from foundations including the Wellcome Trust, a medical charity in London.

Besides, increasing the volume of papers inevitably decreases selectivity and lowers quality, some publishers say. “We and other societies are worried about where [Plan S] puts incentives,” said Brooks Hanson, an executive vice president who oversees publishing at the American Geophysical Union in Washington, D.C., which produces 20 journals, five of them purely open access. “It actually incentivizes publishers to go after more and more papers.”

Science‘s publisher, Bill Moran, says the journal doesn’t want to pursue what he calls “a volume play.” He wants Plan S to carve out an exemption for Science and similar selective journals that reflects their unusual circumstances and roles in scholarly communications. Science accepts only about 7% of manuscripts submitted and publishes, in addition, a variety of news, perspectives, and other nonresearch articles. The journal wouldn’t be sustainable if author fees had to cover all publication costs, Moran says.

Science is unique,” Moran says. “Not all journals are the same. If your goal is to maintain quality, there has to be an exception” to a one-size-fits-all approach like Plan S.

Still, if more funders demanded solely open-access publication, Science might have to make adjustments, he adds. An option might be to charge subscription fees only for nonresearch content, he says.

Smits places the onus on journals and societies to create new business models to adjust to Plan S’s requirements. But the Plan S funders also want to cooperate with societies to move away from subscriptions while maintaining quality. “We are very much interested in having an [author fee] that is fair enough to allow many organizations to flip their journals” to open access, he says.

The Wellcome Trust, one of the Plan S funders, and other groups have said they will publish a report by July on strategies and business models through which scholarly societies in the United Kingdom could make that transition. In addition, Smits met this month with representatives of the Royal Society, based in London, and 10 other midsize scientific societies to discuss how Plan S funders could help them switch. He says the societies are “keen to make the transition. They identified, however, a number of challenges.”

[“source=sciencemag”]

Here’s some of the technology that’s set to make a ‘quantum leap’ in 2019

The Bell Nexus flying taxi at the 2019 CES.

From foldable cellphones to high tech burgers, more than 4,500 companies showcased their latest technology at CES, the world’s largest consumer electronics show which took place in Las Vegas earlier this month.

Even though tech behemoth Apple does not make an appearance, the trade show gives the public a glimpse at emerging tech trends for 2019 and beyond.

One of the most anticipated technologies is 5G – the next generation wireless network that experts say could be as much as ten times faster than broadband.

Cutting edge tech

Cutting edge tech  12:31 PM ET Fri, 18 Jan 2019 | 04:23

“I see a huge quantum leap from going from 4G to 5G, much bigger than 3G to 4G. And of course, my expectation is that we are going to see so much more innovation,” Verizon CEO Hans Vestberg told CNBC recently.

Chris Velazco, Engadget’s senior mobile editor told CNBC’s “On the Money” in an interview that “2019 is going to be the year of 5G, this is going to be the first year people will actually be able to buy devices and jump on the 5G networks,” he said.

As a result, 5G “will have really big ramifications for the way we use our devices and the way these devices talk to each other,” he added.

The technology won’t be for everyone, however – at least not right away. Meanwhile, Velazo admitted that 5G technology “still feels like it’s a lot of talk. We don’t have a great sense of how these things pan out in more concrete ways.”

Yet one technology that did make an impression at CES was foldable screen technology. At the event, LG showcased a 4K OLED TV that rolls up when you don’t want to watch it.

The 65-inch 4K OLED TV when it's fully unrolled.

Watch this super thin TV roll up and disappear in seconds  11:46 AM ET Mon, 7 Jan 2019 | 01:31

But it’s not just big screens: A Chinese company called Royole showed off its flexible screen technology for a smartphone/table called the FlexPai. This is the world’s first commercially available foldable phone, and it beat Samsung and Apple to market. The company is currently taking orders: The cost? A whopping $1,318, even more than an iPhone.

However you may want to hold off. Velazco had a chance to check out the device while at CES, and he admitted “they’re maybe not the most polished devices.”

Yet he found the technology compelling. “The ability to fold out and use the phone as a tablet is frankly really powerful,” he told CNBC.

If you’re looking to take a deeper dive into meditation, a Canadian company called Interaxon recently released the Muse 2.

The headband goes across your forehead and reads brainwaves in real-time. It then uses auditory cues to provide feedback on the user’s meditation state.

When it comes to virtual and augmented reality (AR) technology, it usually means wearing large glasses over your eyes, blocking out the world around you.

Chinese startup Nreal has plans this year to release their version called Light – which as its name suggests – is a lighter version.

“They’ve been able to take the technology that makes some really impressive AR devices like the Microsoft HoloLens and the Magic Leap and converted it down to this form factor,” Velazco told CNBC.

Impossible Burger

Air New Zealand
Impossible Burger

But the tech editor admits one of the bigger surprises at CES, based on the level of people that seemed into it, was Gillette’s heated razor. And the name really says it all.

“It’s a heated razor that’s meant to sort of replicate the experience of getting a hot towel wet shave at a barber shop.” The razor is not in stores yet but according to Engadet’s report, it will retail for $160.

Another surprising find at CES was burgers. Impossible Foods showed off their latest meatless burger recipe: Impossible Burger 2.0.

“The original Impossible Burger used wheat protein and it tasted pretty good, but it kind of didn’t give you the same kind of mouth feel that a traditional burger would,” Velazco explained. “So they rejiggered the formula. This [latest version] is based on soy protein.”

He added: “You actually get a bit more of the experience of eating meat, plus I think the flavor has been upgraded as well.”

[“source=cnbc”]