This Article Is Fake News. But It’s Also The Work of AI

Image result for This Article Is Fake News. But It’s Also The Work of AIThe use of fake news stories for political disinformation has become a major concern for governments around the world in the wake of the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The Federal Bureau of Investigation concluded Russia used false news reports, spread through social media, to try to sway voters. Writing these stories still needed someone to sit behind a keyboard.

Now OpenAI, a non-profit artificial intelligence research group in San Francisco, has unveiled a machine learning algorithm that can generate coherent text, including fake news articles, after being given just a small sample to build on. The algorithm can be tuned to imitate the writing style of the sample text.

Here’s an example of the system at work that OpenAI provided. The system was only given the first two sentences, which were written by a human:

A train carriage containing controlled nuclear materials was stolen in Cincinnati today. Its whereabouts are unknown.

And this is the rest of the news article that the AI wrote, with no human guidance:

The incident occurred on the downtown train line, which runs from Covington and Ashland stations.

In an email to Ohio news outlets, the U.S. Department of Energy said it is working with the Federal Railroad Administration to find the thief.

“The theft of this nuclear material will have significant negative consequences on public and environmental health, our workforce and the economy of our nation,” said Tom Hicks, the U.S. Energy Secretary, in a statement. “Our top priority is to secure the theft and ensure it doesn’t happen again.”

The stolen material was taken from the University of Cincinnati’s Research Triangle Park nuclear research site, according to a news release from Department officials.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission did not immediately release any information.

According to the release, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Security is leading that team’s investigation.

“The safety of people, the environment and the nation’s nuclear stockpile is our highest priority,” Hicks said. “We will get to the bottom of this and make no excuses.

Because of its potential to be misused for creating disinformation, OpenAI said it had chosen not to make the most powerful versions of its algorithm available for public use nor was it publishing the source code and training data used to create the software.

 

[“source=fortune”]

Fact Check: The news behind Indian woman soldier dying in Kashmir is fake

The post was also shared by hundreds of individual accounts on Facebook and Twitter.

A photo collage of a woman soldier is doing rounds on the social media claiming that she lost her life in Kashmir on January 23, 2019.

The archived version of the post can be seen here.

India Today Fact Check found this post to be totally false as no woman soldier died fighting this January.

The viral photo collage was posted by a Facebook page Bharatiy Yoddha’, which is followed by over 300,000 users. The post was shared by nearly 1,920 users.

The post was also shared by hundreds of individual accounts on Facebook and Twitter.

The viral post contains three photos of a woman soldier who, the post said, were martyred and two photos of the cremation ceremony. The translation of the viral post’s caption written in Hindi reads, Alas! Kashmir (23/1/19) Kavita Saini martyred, she was posted in Kashmir. May God rest her soul in peace. Pay tribute by writing Jai Hind..Jai Hind).

India Today Fact Check spoke to DIG of Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF), Dinakaran, who confirmed that the message attached to the viral post was completely false as no woman soldier have died fighting on the border in last one year. The officer also confirmed that the CRPF has never deployed women on the Kashmiri borders.

A Facebook profile named Kavita Saini’ also had these images uploaded on her timeline.

Through Kavita’s Facebook account, India Today Fact Check got a link to another Facebook user’s account which had posted more images of the same woman.

When the images were zoomed in, the name on the woman’s uniform badge revealed that her name is Kajal Kumari and not Kavita Saini.

A Google search about Kavita Saini showed an article published by Aaj Ki Satta, which also claimed that a woman named Kavita Saini was martyred in Kashmir.

The district bureau chief of the portal, Suresh Piplodiya told India Today TV that he had received this information from someone in Rajasthan and that he couldn’t confirm the source of the information.

The remaining two images claiming to be of the soldier’s funeral also do not belong to her. The first one belongs to Lance Naik Hamraj’s funeral who was killed by Pakistani soldiers on the LoC in 2014. The second one dates back to May 2017 when two Nagpur children died a tragic deathfrom electrocution.

India Today Fact Check also found that a Twitter account with Kajal Kumari’s name and her pictures in uniform. However, the account hasn’t shown any activity since March 2018.

The news behind Kavita Kumari’s death while fighting on Kashmir’s border is absolutely false.

[“source=indiatoday”]