Arguing about money? A finance expert says these 5 common mistakes could ruin your relationship

We learn about money in school, but not about how to talk about it — and yet, it’s one of the of biggest reasons why people argue in relationships.

One dynamic we often see in relationships is when one person is a spender, and the other is a saver. The spender might have years’ worth of credit card debt or student loans, while the saver might have good credit and minimal or no debt. When two people have opposing views on finances, it can easily lead to conflict.

The first (and most crucial) step to avoiding a relationship disaster is to simply talk about it. When that moment comes, make sure you avoid these five common mistakes:

1. Bad timing

Timing is everything. If one partner seems particularly stressed after work, it might not be the right time to bombard them with bills and deadlines. Finding the right time is crucial to have the most productive conversation. You know your partner better than anyone, so pick a time when you know they’ll be the most receptive. This will make the discussion more productive.

2. Talking about the wrong things

When couples argue over finances, it’s typically because of what hasn’tbeen discussed — plans that were not communicated, expectations that were not explained and assumptions that went unspoken. Simply addressing your concerns can prevent a lot of these arguments. While you might touch on some uncomfortable topics, it’ll hopefully lead to a deep and fruitful conversation about things like your hopes for the future, retirement goals, worries, dream splurges, and so on.

Self-made millionaire Ramit Sethi: Here's why you should spend a lot of money on your wedding

Self-made millionaire Ramit Sethi: Here’s why you should spend a lot of money on your wedding

3. Hiding and lying about money

According to a recent GOBankingRates survey, about a quarter of Americans lie to their partner about their finances. Needless to say, this can be a major source of contention. Whether it’s about your income, spending habits, credit score or income, when you lie to your partner, you’re also lying to yourself. The saying “what you don’t know can’t hurt you” doesn’t apply to a healthy financial relationship. Being honest with yourself and your partner is one of the easiest ways to avoid arguments and hurting each other’s feelings.

4. Being a crappy listener

What’s the point of having a conversation if you’re both distracted and constantly interrupting each other? Instead of making your partner feel defensive or argumentative, let them know you’re completely present. Make eye contact and put the phones away. Another tip is to repeat back what you heard to your partner from time to time. It shows that you’re paying attention and ensures that you understood them correctly.

5. Having a closed mind

We all value money differently. What one person considers a bargain, the other might call expensive. The goal isn’t to judge your partner’s actions and behaviors, it’s to have a clearer understanding of where they’re coming from. A discussion about money is a discussion about values. When you know what your partner values, you can be a bit more compassionate about their decisions. And sometimes, you can simply agree to disagree.

[“source=cnbc”]

Few open-access journals meet requirements of Plan S, study says

Only a small proportion of open-access scientific journals fully meet the draft requirements of Plan S, the initiative primarily by European funders to make all papers developed with their support free to read, a study has found. Compliance with the rules could cost the remaining journals, especially smaller ones, more than they can afford.

Plan S, which takes effect next year, stipulates that any published research funded by its members must appear on open-access platforms that meet certain requirements. At most, only 889, or 15%, of 5987 science and medical journals listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ) would fully comply with Plan S, according to data gathered by Jan Erik Frantsvåg of the University of Tromsø–the Arctic University of Norway and Tormod Strømme of the University of Bergen in Norway. They published their findings on the Preprints platform on 16 January. Even fewer journals in the social sciences and humanities complied fully: only 193, or 3%, of 6290 such publications.

Frantsvåg and Strømme identified 14 criteria in the Plan S draft rules that journals must meet if participating funders are to permit publication in them. Some rules concern editorial policy, such as that journals must allow authors to retain copyright. Others deal with technical matters—journals must provide full text in machine-readable formats, such as XML, to allow for text and data mining. Of the 14 criteria, Frantsvåg and Strømme could assess only nine criteria using available DOAJ data, which means even fewer than 15% of science and biomedical journals might fully comply with Plan S.

Frantsvåg and Strømme add that a lack of compliance doesn’t necessarily signal a lack of quality. Only one of the nine criteria they reviewed relates to quality: the requirement for some form of peer review. Almost all journals registered in the DOAJ meet this criterion, they report. The DOAJ is a large compendium of open-access journals that meet certain standards of quality control.

The required technical fixes may be too expensive for some smaller open-access journals unless Plan S provides them deadline extensions, exempts them, or helps them develop open-source publishing software that meets the requirements, the study says. That’s especially true for the many open-access journals that don’t charge author fees. Larger publishers will probably find it easier to meet Plan S’s requirements, Frantsvåg and Strømme say. Their journals are closer to full compliance with Plan S than other journals are, thanks to economies of scale and higher revenues.

Frantsvåg and Strømme say they aren’t arguing against Plan S. “But we want to warn that the current timeline will pose a threat to a number of open access journals of good scholarly quality that scholars do not want to lose,” they write. Much of the public debate about Plan S’s consequences has focused on limiting researchers’ ability to publish in traditional, prestigious, subscription-based journals, they note, rather than the plan’s effects on open-access journals.

Robert-Jan Smits, the European Commission’s open-access envoy in Brussels, who is one of the architects of Plan S, wrote in an email to ScienceInsider that existing open-access journals demonstrate that viable, high-quality alternatives to subscription-based journals already exist.

Compliance with Plan S “is a responsibility of the journals, platforms, and repositories themselves,” he wrote. “Our revised implementation guidance, which will be presented in the spring following public consultation, will show that the road to full compliance with Plan S is quite feasible.” (The public comment period ends 8 February.)

The Plan S funders are already providing support to help publishers make the transition, Smits said. The Wellcome Trust hired a contractor this month to help scientific societies that publish both open-access and subscription-based journals develop business models under which they could make all their journals open access.

“For some, [compliance] will not require that much, for others, a bit more will have to be done, as is also mentioned in the study,” Smits wrote. “I am convinced that an increasing number of [open-access] publishers are willing to go that extra mile because they certainly will want to include in their journals the high volume of high-quality research output coming in the future from Plan S grantholders.”

 

[“source=sciencemag”]

With more tariffs, US-China trade outlook looks grim, says data

US,China,Trade

With seven weeks to go until a deadline that could see the U.S. ramp up tariffs on Chinese goods once again, the economic damage wrought by the months-long trade war is becoming clearer even as a pathway to a lasting resolution remains muddied.

While Chinese goods going to the U.S. initially held up in the face of higher tariffs due to so-called front-loading, their value slumped in the final quarter of 2018, according to the latest available data. For sales going the other direction, the crunch was more immediate. In both cases, further declines are on the cards if the talks fail to produce a resolution.

Negotiators from both the U.S. and China expressed optimism after mid-level talks wrapped in Beijing this week, boosting sentiment across global markets. Still, the path forward remains unclear: Another round of talks hasn’t been scheduled, and the government shutdown in the U.S. has dominated President Donald Trump’s attention.

Both Trump and Chinese Vice President Wang Qishan were slated to appear later this month at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, providing an opportunity for high-level dialogue. But the shutdown may yet prevent Trump’s appearance, according to a report in the Wall Street Journal.

Companies in both countries just want to see a deal get done.

“We urge both governments to use the time remaining in the 90-day negotiating period to make tangible progress on the important issues at the core of the current dispute: equal treatment of foreign companies in China, as well as China’s intellectual property and technology transfer policies,” said Jake Parker, vice president of China operations at the U.S.-China Business Council in Beijing. “Uncertainty is bad for business.”

As evidence mounts by the day that the slowdown in China’s economy is worsening, policy makers in Beijing are focusing on getting rid of the duties that Trump has leveled on Chinese goods since last year, according to a former high-level official briefed on the government’s thinking. U.S. officials appear to want to maintain the pressure of tariffs, the official said.

China and the U.S. will move ahead with trade talks as scheduled, Ministry of Commerce Spokesman Gao Feng told reporters in Beijing at a regular weekly briefing Thursday, without giving any further details over when they would take place. He wouldn’t confirm reports that Vice Premier Liu He will visit the U.S. soon to meet U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer.

Meanwhile, the economic risks are growing. Economists now see the threat of deflation in China after producer price inflation slowed sharply in December, to the weakest pace since 2016.

That would not only squeeze corporate profitability at home, but also put pressure on global price gains, as export prices usually follow those at factory gate. With industrial output and retail sales growth both at the weakest levels in a decade, China’s woes would also mean softer demand for imports, hurting other economies including the U.S.

A reduction in Chinese imports of U.S. goods came quickly after the retaliatory imposition of tariffs, the data show. Without a breakthrough in talks, U.S. corporations are likely to experience a deepening decline in their Chinese sales, with Bank of America Merrill Lynch analysts even seeing an “informal boycott” in place.

The full year numbers will look somewhat different, partly because China has resumed purchases of U.S. soybeans and other goods. Even if the current truce is made permanent and the tariffs are eventually rolled back, the damage to many companies may already be done.

China’s trade data for the full year of 2018 is due to be released on Jan. 14, and economists see year-on-year export growth slowing in December from November.

The Trump administration is pushing for a way to make sure China delivers on its commitments in any deal. Trump and Xi have given their officials until March 1 to reach an accord on “structural changes” to China’s economy on issues such as the forced transfer of American technology, intellectual-property rights and non-tariff barriers.

“The hard work of addressing structural issues to create a level playing field in China do not appear to have been resolved,” said Lester Ross, a policy committee chief at the American Chamber of Commerce and also partner-in-charge at the Beijing office of law firm WilmerHale. “And China going forward will likely still want to increase the diversification of its sources of supply even for agricultural commodities.”

The 90-day time frame is a tight window in which to nail down deep changes to China’s economic model, reforms which past U.S. administrations advocated for years and U.S. lawmakers on both sides of the aisle support.

Even so, progress in talks signals that an interim deal that suspends new tariff hikes is possible, according to Louis Kuijs, head of Asia economics at Oxford Economics in Hong Kong.

“The earlier escalation of the trade conflict between the U.S. and China and souring bilateral relations appear to have given way to a more conciliatory approach since early December,” he wrote in a note Thursday. “However, we do not see the U.S. fully removing the specter of tariff hikes any time soon.”

[“source-“hindustantimes”]

This Startup’s New Passenger Drone Is ‘Like a Flight Simulator That You Can Ride In,’ CEO Says

This Startup's New Passenger Drone Is 'Like a Flight Simulator That You Can Ride In,' CEO Says

If Matt Chasen gets his way, there will be a time – in the not-so-distant future – when commuters are able to order an air taxi that whisks them across town in minutes, bypassing traffic-clogged streets below.

For now, however, the chief executive of LIFT Aircraft will have to use his start-up’s electric-powered vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft, the Hexa, for something else: 15-minute flights across a lake outside Austin, Texas, for $249 (roughly Rs. 17,300) a pop.

Though the flights will target a recreational crowd, Chasen sees them as a steppingstone to a new form of convenient urban transportation.

“Today’s regulatory environment does not allow for a transportation use of these aircraft – yet,” said Chasen, a former Boeing engineer with a background in mechanical and aerospace engineering. “We’ll build public trust in the technology. Once that happens, it’s inevitable that people will want to use it for certain types of commuting flights.”

It may take years, Chasen said, but the payoff could be immense, as the race to create autonomous flying vehicles begins, with companies such as Uber, Airbus and Volocopter already developing them.

Unlike with conventional aircraft, the Federal Aviation Administration does not require a pilot’s license to operate a “powered ultralight” craft. The agency’s rules require instead that ultralights operate during daylight hours in open areas and limit their use to sport and recreation.

To operate the Hexa, Chasen said, customers will undergo an orientation that includes watching safety videos and training in a virtual-reality simulator for up to an hour. A basic proficiency test will follow, then preflight checks with ground support.

The drone-like aircraft – which is controlled using a joystick in the cockpit and stabilized by a flight computer – weighs 432 pounds, seats one person, and has 18 sets of propellers, motors and batteries. Prospective pilots have to weigh less than 250 pounds. During flight, Chasen said, pilots can see safety information on an augmented-reality display inside the aircraft. In the event of an emergency, he said, flight controllers can take over the aircraft and fly it remotely like a drone. Chasen compared the flying experience to “a flight simulator that you can ride in.”

The aircraft can travel just over 60 mph at top speed and includes air-cushioned floats, allowing it to land on water if necessary.

“Unlike traditional helicopters, you don’t need great skill to fly the Hexa,” he said. “If you completely let go of the joystick, the aircraft just hovers in GPS position hold. It’s programmed so that if battery levels get down to a certain level, the aircraft will automatically return to the launch site.”

LIFT hopes to begin offering flights over a popular lake outside Austin next year. The company announced last week that it is also considering 25 cities across the country for other “aircraft hubs,” which would be located near tourist destinations and entertainment areas. Though the cities have yet to be named, the company is already accepting reservations.

“I could envision a Lift location right from a pier on the Seattle waterfront,” Chasen told GeekWire.

Chasen said he doesn’t think the FAA will certify vertical-takeoff-and-landing aircraft for commercial transportation until they’re proved safe. Once that happens, he said, a new wave of alternative transportation is likely to quickly emerge.

In five to 10 years, he predicts, aircraft like the Hexa will play a very different role in urban environments, becoming an “alternative to driving” for certain types of trips.

“I think we will be one option among many if it’s rush hour, and you can fly for 10 minutes as opposed to driving for 90 minutes,” Chasen said. “It think it’ll be a niche thing to start out, but at some point, it won’t be surprising to see aircraft taking off from rooftops in cities on a regular basis.”

[“source-ndtv”]

“For Opposition Leaders, Modi Is The Issue,” Says PM: Highlights

'For Opposition Leaders, Modi Is The Issue,' Says PM: HighlightsMinister Narendra Modi on New Year’s day spoke on several important people and political issues including Rafale deal, surgical strikes, demonetisation, triple talaq and Goods and Services Tax in an interview with news agency ANI.

He also spoke on BJP’s loss in assembly elections in five states in the recently concluded assembly elections. “In Telangana and Mizoram, nobody gave BJP any chance. In Chhattisgarh, a clear mandate was given, BJP lost. But in two states, there was a hung assembly. Secondly, we were fighting against 15 years of anti-incumbency.We are discussing what was lacking,” PM Modi said

Taking a jibe at the opposition, PM Modi said that 2019 elections will be “grand alliance versus the people”.  PM Modi also spoke on the Ram Temple issue ahead of the Supreme Court hearing on January 4. “Ordinance on Ram temple can be considered after legal process gets over,” he told ANI.

[“source-ndtv”]